Looking To Bowie: The Inspiration For Kristina Fidelskaya’s Fall/Winter 2018 Line

“I am my own muse,” declares fashion designer Kristina Fidelskya, and it’s this unabashed confidence that makes her eponymous label’s Fall/Winter 2018 line so effortlessly irresistible.

Kristina Fidelskaya founded her label in 2014 with a vision of creating luxurious, ready-to-wear fashion for the “discerning woman with European taste,” with pieces meant to ignite a sense of femininity and elegance in everyday wear.

This Fall/Winter 2018 line offers something of an exciting departure for the internationally acclaimed designer. Femininity gives way to androgyny; the soft pastels of her Spring line are replaced with colours inspired by the work of Alberto Burri on the combustion of vinyl. Think neutrals like ivory, tan, charcoal, and black, offset by a very delicious candy apple red. Slouching trenches, oversized shoulders, and breezy trousers lend a devil-may-care attitude to the designer’s 2018 runway show at the Paris Fashion Week.

In a recent press release, the brand has revealed its inspirations behind this season’s line: the iconic image of Bowie exiting New York’s Carlyle Hotel in the ’70s, the “nonchalance of Parisian women walking down the Avenue Hoche in the ’90s,” and the “timeless and chic simplicity of Elsa Peretti for Halston.” Still present is Kristina Fidelskaya’s signature dress coat.

The through-line of this new line is undeniably a focus on the waistline; even the baggiest and most oversized of silhouettes is cinched perfectly at the naval, offering a classic hourglass silhouette that juxtaposes those androgynous vibes with a touch of classic femininity. Furthering this “spirit of deconstruction” is soft tailoring and a natural elegance throughout, enhanced by silk fringes that playfully nod to the 1970s. The materials are manifold: shearling, pure cashmere, dry wool, and silk are the luxurious textiles at play in this effortless collection.

There’s a lot to love here, especially the ebony black metallic jersey and glossy gabardines. The real star, though, is a matte, papery leather that somehow feels retro and futuristic all at once. It makes sense; according to the brand, this line seeks to merge our idealized past with an assumed modernity for the “strong, rebellious woman.” Oui!

KHACHILIFE Editorial